Tuna for Breakfast????

by Dawn Oaks on November 10, 2012 · 2 comments

One morning this week, our 8 year old asked for tuna for breakfast.  For some of you, this will probably seem like no big deal.  To others, it sounds like the wierdest thing you have ever heard.  In the world of cold cereal, pop tarts, and frozen waffles, tuna can seem like a rather odd choice for breakfast.

In raising our children, we have attempted to train them to listen to their bodies.  Our desire is for them to eat when they are hungry and to stop when they are full.  We have also encouraged them to listen to what types of food their body is craving.

So, tuna fish for breakfast makes perfect sense.  Our little guy goes hard from the minute he wakes up until the time he goes to bed.  He needs energy.  He is also going through a growth spurt.  His body needs extra protein to keep up with his accelerated muscle growth that is accompanying the growth of his bones.  The night before, he had also fallen asleep from a really big day before eating a good dinner.  He woke up hungry.  He wanted fuel to get him going.

My encouragement to you is that the next time you or your children seem to want something quite odd at a particular time, take a moment to think why your body might be craving this food.  This doesn’t apply to junk food!!!  A good rule of thumb is that if you can not name what God made that is in it, you probably have no business eating it.  Whole foods as close to their original form are always a winner.

The old adage, “Listen before you speak (or open your mouth)”, applies to eating just as much as being mindful of the nature of the words that we utter and how they will affect others.

~ Dr. Dawn

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{ 2 comments… read them below or add one }

Lisa Capehart November 20, 2012 at 4:54 PM

This is a wonderful post, Dawn. Tuna for breakfast sounds great! From the time I was a little girl, I preferred unconventional foods for breakfast, like leftovers from the prior night’s supper. Luckily, my mom supported this “weird” preference. Now, in my own coaching practice with women, I also encourage them to listen to their body and their cravings, as well as their hunger and fullness levels. What a blessing for your kids to know to trust what their bodies are telling them. We’d probably have less of an obesity problem in this country if more kids (and adults) would follow this philosophy.

Lisa 🙂

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Dawn Oaks November 26, 2012 at 4:53 AM

We just need to keep passing the message along, Lisa.

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